Monday, December 16, 2013

USGS r-packages for hydrology

As I learn AGU Fall meeting, USGS is committed to develop various R Packages to help analysis of hydrological data.

These packages include:
  • GLRItcl
  • usgs-r.github.com: Splash page for USGS-R organization
  • EflowStats: Calculates Hydrologic Indicator stats and fundamental properties of daily streamflow for a given set of data
  • EGRET: An R-package for the analysis of long-term changes in water quality and streamflow, including the water-quality method Weighted Regressions on Time, Discharge, and Season (WRTDS)
  • EflowStats: Calculates Hydrologic Indicator stats and fundamental properties of daily streamflow for a given set of data. A related poster, presented at AGU Fall meeting 2013, can be found here.
  • USGSwsBase: Base USGS water science R functions.
  • surragateRegression
  • dataRetrieval: This R package is designed to obtain its water quality sample data, streamflow data, and metadata directly from either the USGS NWIS (National Water Information System), but it allows for user-supplied text files as inputs. The program is designed to ingest the data directly into R and structure them into file structures suited for EGRET analysis.
  • USGSwsQW: Water quality USGS water science R functions.
  • USGSwsStats:Statistic USGS water science R functions.
  • USGSwsData: Data sets as data.frames and as text files for examples in the USGS core pacakges
  • USGSwsGraphs: Graphical USGS water science R functions
  • restrend
  • rloadest
  • DVstats
  • NWCCompare
  • rGDP
  • functionCollection
All of them can be retrieved from the USGS-R Github repository. Link to other R packages useful for hydrology can be found at the main R post.

3 comments:

  1. Relatively simple question, but is there an R package to calculate discharge? Have many sample sites with area-velocity measurements and need to calculate discharge from these on an annual basis and would like to make the process more efficient and open.

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    Replies
    1. Dear Unknown,

      you have to ask to some USGS guy. However, it depends actually what do you exactly mean. If you are looking for a rainfall-runoff model, you can find some of them here: http://abouthydrology.blogspot.it/2012/08/r-resources-for-hydrologists.html (see, for instance, airGR)

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